Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) research at the Quadram Institute

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) research at the Quadram Institute


Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem
caused by bacteria which develop resistance to antimicrobial drugs. This is a serious life-threatening issue,
as treating infections and safely performing routine medical procedures could become impossible. The Quadram Institute is contributing to the
battle against AMR, but we need a coordinated coordinated global approach based on the One Health approach that integrates studies of microbes and humans, animals, food and the environment to improve awareness; strengthen knowledge; reduce infections; optimise antimicrobial use; and develop sustainable investments. The Quadram Institute is maximising the cluster
of academic excellence and clinical expertise of the Norwich Research Park. We are using our interdisciplinary knowledge
to develop evidence-based strategies to reduce the economic and societal cost of AMR. We are researching the mechanisms that drive
the emergence of AMR and identifying where they are found in the food chain. By understanding this, we will identify where
intervention can be most effective or where surveillance is most needed. We are investigating which type of bacteria
are causing infections. Better diagnostics will tell us which drugs
will successfully treat infections and reduce the inefficient use of drugs that drive the
evolution of AMR. We are using our laboratories to replicate
AMR evolution and understand how bacteria become resistant to antimicrobials. By understanding their evolution and survival
process, we will develop new ways of killing bacteria. We are combatting biofilms, where bacteria
live in drug-resistant aggregated communities. This will allow us to develop new methods
of destroying or preventing biofilms in the food chain. And we are mining the microbiome looking for
new antimicrobials to use as new weapons to prevent or treat infections. The Quadram Institute is drawing together
interdisciplinary expertise to understand AMR and reduce its devastating consequences. Adopting the One Health approach and recognising
the interconnected nature of human, animal and environmental health is crucial to tackling
the problem of antimicrobial resistance.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *