Frank, the undulated Moray Eel – Kona, Hawaii

Frank, the undulated Moray Eel – Kona, Hawaii


I’m live. Hello this is Martina
Wing, live from Hawaii with the Manta Rays Advocates. Sometimes the beginning is a little bit confusing to me on what the screen shows me. Anyway here it is. This is my manta ray flying through the picture. It is a few minutes after 11 o’clock.
I’m sorry I’m a little late but I had some technical snafus. That’s always
something of a challenge here on Wednesday mornings. I welcome
you and thanks for being with me on Wednesdays at 11 o’clock. This is
when I go live and talk about manta rays along with things that happen at the Manta
experience. Along with the look behind the scenes with what’s going on here in the
industry. For all the folks that haven’t been here with me, this is where
we live. Hey Denmark is here. Sofia’s thank you so much for
being here. My name is Martina. I dive, film and love the manta rays
for 20 years. I live on this island here. Connie is here too. Welcome thank you for being here. I live on the Big Island of Hawaii. I live actually in Kailua Kona.
There are two dive locations here on the coast line and that’s where you
will go diving with the manta rays or you can go snorkeling as well. Frank,
happy moray day. Yes that’s right. Just wait! It’s going to be fun with some juicy stuff coming up here. Manta rays are big fish. These kind of fish. I talk about
them every week, it’s my true love and my passion. I usually get really excited
when I start talking about them. Today I’m not talking about the
manta rays. I will talk about a frequent visitor we have at the dive site. I’m
really glad Frank is here. Frank Netherwood from California, a big
supporter of my work and because we are talking about Frank the eel. I have
to disappoint Frank Netherwood because it’s actually named after Frank
Hendriks. He used to be the general manager at one of the dive
stores here in town. I want to shout out to Frank Hendriks. I’m going to hope to
visit him next week. He hasn’t had a very good last year health-wise so
I hope to catch up with him really soon. Julia is here too. I love it thanks for
being here. This is great. We have New Zealand, California, Denmark and
Germany already. Love this. Thank you. We’re talking about Moray Eels today and
in particular a Moray Eel that we call Frank he is an Undulated Moray Eel. I have
some footage prepared for you. Carrie’s here too. I love it. It’s Washington State.
When I talk about Frank the eel, there is some juicy stuff right here with the
footage. I don’t want to scare you but I do want to tell you what can happen.
They’re different eels on the island. When you go underwater they’re many different eels. Before I talk about all that stuff I’m going to
switch the camera around and I will tell you with visuals the story from today
about Frank, the undulated Moray Eel. Let me switch around and find the
button. Here we go. We’re talking about Frank
the undulated Moray Eel. We don’t really know if he’s a he or she. It doesn’t
really matter. We have seen this Moray Eel since about 2000 on a regular basis. He’s
about 1.5 feet. No meters.
I’ll change that later on. That’s the length of him. We discovered this particular dive at the airport site in 1999. Since 2000 we really
see him regularly. This is moray eel with teeth. I will show you in a few
minutes more Moray Eels that don’t have teeth. Not all of them are the same.
Consistent sighting. What do I mean by that? Well first of all I have to tell
you, I don’t think it’s always the same “Frank” but it’s so much easier if you
call the undulated moray eels “Frank”. I say that because I don’t know if it’s the
same guy from all these years. When you have two Franks at the dive site
then of course you kind of confused on who’s who. Gita Steiniger is
here. Guess what? That’s my mom! This is awesome. Thanks for being here
mom. That’s funny. About Franks consistent sightings
means that he pretty much shows up every single night
and has a good reason. He has a good reason to show up every night.
Definitely it’s one of Kona’s favorites. When we talk about the manta rays and the
favorites, we talk about Big Bertha, Koie Ray, and Jana Ray. All of these manta rays that we
see on a regular basis. He’s definitely, “Frank” is one of the favorites
to be seen at the dive site. Every diver will be briefed on that
we can see him. He’s a regular. Definitely around.
The next picture I want to give you a selection of more Moray Eels of Hawaii. It’s not the complete version, but gives you an idea of how many different ones are here in these waters. There’s a Tiger Moray. He is one he doesn’t really have strong teeth. He would grind down on his prey or what he eats. There’s more of a
grinding teeth not sharp teeth. Then we have a Dwarf Moray Eel.
He’s so cute. He’s as little as your pinky finger. Super cute. Then we have Garden Eels. It’s called an eel but you know Garden Eels really look more like an asparagus field.
There are lots and lots of them coming out of the sand. We see them in usually
at 100 to 120 feet. Where we dive with the manta rays is a plankton rich
environment so they’re already at 60 feet. Which would be 20 meters for my European fans today. These are Garden Eels. Another kind is a Snowflake Eel. Super,
super cute. Also only has grinding teeth, not sharp teeth. The next one is
a Conger Eel. This is a selection from James pictures. He’s just such an
awesome photographer. I dove into his archive this morning for that Conger Eel. Now we come to the three to
four more Eel’s that have teeth. I always recommend not to mess around with eels. Definitely! Especially because I had an accident many years ago where a Yellowmargin, it’s this kind of eel and it got my hand. Bit me quite a bit. It was
pretty much stupid on my side because I had octopus smell on my hands. You don’t
play with octopus then later on you play around close to an eel. Yellowmargin’s do have teeth. It all worked out for me. There’s one with teeth.
The next one has teeth obviously, it’s a Whitemouth Moray Eel. Big one.
Super, super cute. I mean cute as in sense of beautiful this white mouth
on the inside. We only see this eel during the day. I’ve seen it maybe once
during the night dive. I think they sleep at night? You don’t want to mess with this guy. He does have quite the
big teeth right here. I’ve actually, Tara is here too from Mexico. Yes, the reception is not so good, I know. You are
here now. That is great. With the Viper Moray, I’ve seen him once but not at the
dive site that we usually go to see the manta rays by the airport. This is a special one, Viper Moray. Then we
go back to the undulated Moray Eel. This is Frank. Yes, he has teeth. He has
some teeth on the top. I have some footage where you can see when he uses
his teeth but not on people. It’s on the fish.This was the selection
I wanted to show you about different eel’s we have here. It’s a
selection, it’s not all of them. Then when we dive into this footage, I do
want to make sure you all know that we have not heard of any customer ever been
bitten by Frank! There has not been an incident with Frank involved and
customer. I’m going to put a little P.S. here. We had two dive masters that did get
bit by Frank. They weren’t so smart, because they put their hand into the lightbox which you will see in a few
minutes where Frank likes to hang out. Frank was sitting in the in light
box and the divemaster should have known that Frank would be in the area.
This is definitely a true and honest claim here. We have never heard of
any customer been being bitten by Frank!! This Facebook live is not about
scaring people, it is about educating and looking behind the scenes. Thank you for all the hearts today. I love these. Everybody’s
giving me little hearts. Thank you. Now the question is, Why does this eel
hang out at the campfire? The campfire method is this method of having all the
lights together in one central viewing area. What you see here are dive lights.
The dive lights concentrate plankton. It’s a little stuff right here.
That’s why the manta rays come to the site. Besides attracting manta rays,
attracting plankton and attracting manta rays we have just attracted this
undulated Moray Eel for many years to the site. His reason to
hang out by the lights is because there’s food. You will see his food
here in a second. He’s just going through the lights. Check this out, there are
the fishies. Goat fish hang out there, and the aholehole, the Hawaiian flag tails that hang out there. There’s another goat fish, a different kind. These fish all want
the plankton as well. It’s the chain reaction. Reaction where food it’s abundant. The eel learned let’s go to this place where the lights are
and let’s go and look for some food. It’s a very simple reason why
Frank the undulated Moray Eel hangs out at the campfire. The next footage
is that we do have situations and it happens actually quite frequently where
Frank hangs around the divers. What you see in this footage which I think is
so cool. You see a scuba diver. You see a tank right here. He’s sitting on the
bottom enjoying the manta rays. Not sure, nope he actually knows that there
is an eel right around him. The eel is on his way to food and he
considers divers being an obstacle on his way to the food. You see the diver is
holding still. That’s the best thing you can do.
You hold still. Your briefed to do that as well. Then he’s just going to
swim by this persons hand. I think he gets a little nervous he’s going to put his hand
up here in a second. Even as he moves his hand up, Frank is not like..
they have really bad eyesight. They don’t really see well. He puts his hand down
and the eel swims by. No panic attack. This is
normal footage that we see on a regular basis out here. Where the eel looks around on its way to food. This is my fin that
you see right here. I’m really close and putting my lights on it so I
can get this footage. This is how Frank and the divers. Thank you Connie.
I like this footage too. People are always so afraid of eels. Of
course they have teeth and some have and some don’t. I told you some of these
in the selection of moray eels. Moray eels don’t come to you. If
you don’t smell like fish you’ll be fine. I smelled like fish with the
octopus. I was the exception. I was pretty dumb too. Frank is for this
reason here, he wants to look for a fish. The footage I’m showing you now is a
little bit longer. I think it’s a two-minute clip. You will see the
manta rays are doing their thing and they’re feeding on the plankton. While I was
filming I realized that Frank the eel is in the light boxes
where all the lights are concentrating the plankton. You can
see how Frank actually found a fish. Not only did he found it he caught the fish.
This is pretty cool because you can see the behavior of an eel and how he tries to eat. We’re going to get more stable with the footage
in a second. Frank the eel in this case wants to feed.
He makes himself into a knot. I think you can really see how powerful he is to
get this fish into his mouth. This is pretty cool. He tries really hard to swallow
this fish. Really hard. Now several times he makes a knot and he tries to break
the fish’ neck and then swallow it as a whole. That’s what they do with
all the fish. Now in this case he’s trying to swim away. By the way
there are people in the background. You see peoples hands? They’re all
watching this situation. Frank does realize at some point that the
this fish is a little bit too big. He keeps trying to pull him through and
push him into his own body. I think that’s the fifth or six times he is trying.
If this fish would be a little smaller it would be already in his belly. Frank kind of gives up. He’s like I don’t know what to do
with this fish. One more time. I want you to enjoy this footage.
I’m not talking right now on purpose. The fish actually got away. It’s still
alive. You see all the people in the background? Frank is like I give up, I’m
looking for something else. Frank takes off and he didn’t succeed with this
fish. Then it was really cool this fish he was obviously still alive. People
are having these big eyes by now. The fish is just laying there and then a
dive master comes in, an instructor and it’s actually doing CPR on this fish.
Check this out. He’s making him swim again to get water over his gills so he
can breathe again. This fish actually started to swim again. I’m sorry, I cut this video off too early.
This fish actually swims again and we revived him. It was a happy ending
for this fish. (Fb) Is there a fish that eels hunt for? Yes, eels during the daytime. If you look at eels during the day it’s
the goat fish. They like to hang out with the eels, the trevallies hang out with him too. The fish who he just
tried to eat hangs out with eels too. Not this undulated Moray Eel. You
usually see Whitemouth and Yellowmargins with them during the day. Not
so much at night. I wanted to let you know this footage
ended up in a happy ending. This fish survived. He was totally beat up, but he
survived. I don’t know if he’s still around but he survived this
attack from Frank. This is the reason why Frank comes to the dive site. To
eat! Now to make it a little bit more juicy today, I have
footage where Frank went up to the snorkelers. When I brief the guests
I never mention that Frank goes to the snorkelers. This happened only once. Well
in all my years I’ve been diving with the manta rays. It is such
good footage I had to show it to you. What happens here? The
snorklers were on the surface, they’re enjoying the show. They have Cara
ray right in their face. Barrel rolling underneath them. It’s a really
cool situation. Then someone sneaks into the picture. Check it out.
This eel, this Frank he swam all the way up to the through the water column.
It was all the way to a 30 foot water column. 10 meters. He swims
through snorkelers. I couldn’t believe it. I never seen this before. The
people don’t even see it because they have such limited sight with their masks. Unfortunately, I’m blasting them
with my lights right now to get this footage. The eel that wanted to get these fish well he just got a little bit all
over the place. Now here comes a really good scene. I’m not going to say
anything. This lady thinks I’m filming her and then realizes there’s an eel
right in front of her. The next two ladies… Come on you have to give me a few likes for this one! The people don’t even see him swimming right through them.
Hi Michael. Hi, Mike Best. That’s cool. You’re in the right place here
where we have the eel going through snorkelers. Frank on the surface.
Again, this happened only once in all these years. Now you can actually see
how he swims back down towards the divers there on the bottom. I’m
swimming through bubbles. Cool footage and I really wanted to
share this with you. This is cool.
Aloha Mike. This is great. I wanted to show you this footage of
Frank the eel. I’m going to switch around, this is the end of the footage. Hi
everybody, I’m back. This was the footage for today. I wanted to show you
how Frank the eel is around divers only and once only around the snorkelers.
He’s really a cool eel. I want to share with you that
this is a frequent visitor that we see pretty much every single night. Mike
Best is here with me. Mike you dove with me maybe I don’t know 10-
12 years ago. I think Mike still remembers Frank too. This
eel is so used to this campfire method by the light boxes in the middle
and the lightbox attracts the lights then the plankton attracts small
fish and eel. Frank the eel learned the behavior. Yes, you remember Frank. Judith, hello Martina I love Frank the eel. That’s right. Every single diver on the
boat when we do the briefing and we show a picture and say hey this is what’s
going to happen, everybody’s like oh my gosh. Then underwater it really
happens to them. So exciting and so much adrenaline
going through everybody but in the end everybody loves Frank. I mean he’s
definitely on the nights when we don’t have manta rays, Frank is there and makes everybody happy. He takes over the show and it’s really
fun. It’s really fun. Carrie is saying “Hi” to my cousin Linda is watching from
San Francisco. That’s right. Very cool, San Francisco is here too. I love this.
Whoever watches the replay by the way always put in where you’re watching it
from as I love to connect with the world. We’re all manta ray advocates as
soon as we know about manta rays and we fall in love with them and we want to
educate other people about it. We are all manta ray advocates. This was my
facebook live for today. I hope you enjoyed this. I will be back next week
and we have something special planned. I have to get some technology lined up. Tara and myself we will be doing an
interview next week. It’s my anniversary 20 years in town swimming with manta
rays educating about them, loving them and sharing with the world that these
manta rays are something that needs to be protected and to be
enjoyed. This is all for today. If you like this Facebook live, share
it, like it, love it, give me a thumbs up. Anything you want.
Thanks for being here with me today and talk to you later.

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