Little known Sea Trout Coast, Denmark, Djursland

Little known Sea Trout Coast, Denmark, Djursland


We are in east-Jutland, Djursland, Denmark, in Northern Europe, at one of Djurslands most remote beaches. The purpose is a sea-trout walk, in part to take a look at a good sea trout fishing spot, and in part to recommend a good walk. One drives to the end of Glatved Strandvej, and gets to on of the most unvisited coasts on Djursland where one 1.2 – 1.5 km out find a, as to names a bit anonymous, cape sticking out. A classical sea trout spot, at least for those with local knowledge. The cause is also that we have had a historical high tide on December 6. 2013, where the sea level was at least 1.5 meters above normal, meaning, amongst other things, that this fisherman’s boat has been slung thoroughly up. We are quite a bit up on the shore, and Miss butterfly, over there, has been half covered with big stones that have been thrown up on the beach. Let’s go and have a look at the quite unknown sea-trout cape. The closest one gets to a name is “Holly Well” (Helligkilde) because something out there, at least in older times, was a holly well. Now we have come a bit about 1 km up the coast, and are getting close to an area here, called, “The Fridge” named informally, because an old fridge lay here washed up in the shore for some years it’s a part with relatively deep water, before the sea trout beach up there, where it’s worth fishing, if on wants a bit of flat fish, with hopes of cod, of which it is not very likely here, but a little stop on the way, to see if there might be some fish, that stay in the deeper end. Coming up here – I don’t know if one can see it on the waves – is a shallow-water area, with relatively big stones reaching far out, and this is where, there might be a concentration of sea trout. One can see that the waves get a bit longer, and maybe brake a bit easier, simply a sign of shallow water, If you are casting with a lure, and don’t compensate for it, by drawing the line in faster, and fishing more at the surface – well then the classical event up here is to catch the bottom and loose ones lure – here is the sea trout area, that I suggest, one aims for. It is a couple of km south of “Havknude” a more known sea trout place. As mentioned, it has not got a real name. Theres is something called “Helligkilde” on old maps, but the actual cape here, has not got any name. It lies down from the slopes we see up there, that is recognizable as beech scrub in summer. It’s December 12., 2013, so it is leafless – but here. If one fishes from aprox. here, and forward, along the slopes that we are coming to, then one is zoomed in on classical sea trout waters. Not because one shouldn’t fish up along the coast, this one can also do, but if one is very focused on sea trout, well – then it is up here. The waves get longer, and break earlier, as a sign of it being really shallow waters. The storm surge which came about a week ago is one of the more classical – hello dog. Talk is of a 200 year event, at least on Sealand and at the Roskilde side, talk is of a 1000 year event. It was seemingly close to that the Viking ships at the Roskilde-museum where flooded. A reorganization of the beech has simply taken place. Suddenly sand has appeared here, where there was no sand before. As one can see – a lot of drift wood has been thrown up on the coast – part of the charm of going for walks here – to see if one can find something. Another thing special for this coast is, that if one knows where, and when, to look, one can find amber. I have done it myself here without knowing to much about when and where, but if one knows more, one can find more. As a lady, who was going for a walk with the dogs, said “We have been given a new sandy beach.” Where there where stones before, there is sand, solely as a consequence of the high tide event taking place about a week ago. Now we come round to a place, whith quite significant coastal erosion, these slopes are also worth a visit when coming here. Let’s take a closer look at them. This is simply a down fall area, an aprox. 10 – 12 meter high incline with earth and big stones like this one constantly crashing into the sea not small, probably weighs a ton, maybe it is some of this material, that has contributed to the new sandy beech, or maybe not, it seems a bit more clay-like. A bit dramatic, and a somewhat interesting, going for walks a place like this. People who are interested in geology, can se the development of different layers. One shouldn’t be foolish on this, because if one gets something like this in the head, one will probably die. The lady I just met, said that there had also been some downfall today. I wonder if it is because of frost. I think it might just be effects of the big erosion which came when the water was up to here, 1.5 meters above normal , thereby really chopping into the coast. In all the 50 years I have come here, it has more or less looked like this, with lumps of earth and big stones that have fallen down. Before I came out here, I checked with a map, to see if one could detect, that the shore was further out. I saw a historical map, that went up to 1940, and It seemed like 10 – 12 meters have probably been snatched in that period. My guess is, that it might be a bit more. This is simply on a regular basis – it happens all the time. There has been a house up there, I have been told, which was simply removed, and rebuilt, as one knew, that it was only a question of time, before it would disappear. It is some clay-lumpy something. Down from here, it is also interesting to fish, just as the coast is also interesting for walks. Tthe places where things have fallen down, layers, stones and other stuff has been exposed, that has been hidden away for millions of years. One can be the first person to see something prehistoric, if one comes out here, right after an event, where it has been high tide and storm on this east-facing coast on Djursland.

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