Rubber Gloves Recommended: The Art of Moving an Electric Eel

Rubber Gloves Recommended: The Art of Moving an Electric Eel


Today, we got to move our Electric Eel from
his original exhibit that’s he’s been in since it opened into a new exhibit. It’s a little bit larger with more structures,
plants, wood and things for him to explore. Of course, the main concern was his electric
shock, that if he decided to give a discharge, we needed to be prepared. The big thing was just wearing rubber gloves
like the ones I use on a daily basis whenever I have to clean inside his exhibit. We used a two-net system just to make sure
he was comfortable in one net and used another one kind of as extra support. We just very carefully handed him to a couple
of different people — kind of like an assembly line — and got him safely into the new exhibit. Oh, here he comes! There he is. He’s definitely doing a lot of exploring. It’s going to take a while, I’m sure, because
there are so many more things and objects in this exhibit than in his previous one. It’ll take him some time, I’m sure, since
he can’t see very well, and he’s using that electricity to find his way around. It’ll take him a while to sorta kinda “map”
the exhibit so he gets familiar with where things are. [Speakers POP and CRACKLE] The first thing that people, of course, they
will hear the noise and then go, “What’s that?” Then, they look, and they see the lights. Right away, they think that the animal itself
is making that noise. Well, unfortunately, it’s a little bit of
wizardry on our part. We have three different electrical probes
that are in the water picking up all the pulses the Electric Eel is giving off. I think people just are astounded that an
animal can produce electricity. For us to be able to have one on display really
helps educate people and show that we have an animal like this that lives … Normally, in the wild, they’re found in little
mud holes. For him to be able to be displayed like this,
people can see him. They can see from the lights and sound — they
can hear — him giving off his discharge.

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