Why I Call IBS A Garbage Can Diagnosis

Why I Call IBS A Garbage Can Diagnosis


Eric Bakker… naturopath here. Thanks for coming back. By now you will have seen hopefully some of
my videos on this channel. I’m going to talk about Irritable Bowel Syndrome
and why I believe it’s a garbage can diagnosis. To me, it’s like tension headache – garbage
can diagnosis. Premenstrual Syndrome – garbage can diagnosis. Let me explain. When people get sick of have problems, there’s
always a cause. But the issue in medicine is, it’s not important
to look for the cause. It’s more important to look at treating the
symptom because that placates the patient and makes them happy. It takes the pain and suffering away, it makes
them feel good. Makes you feel good because you’ve done something
useful for them. But in fact, you’ve robbed that person because
you haven’t identified how the problem started, or how you could best stop that problem from
getting worse instead of masking the symptom with a pill or a surgery, and how you can
stop it from progressing. And how you can identify the cause, fix it
up, so the person then understands how to fish instead of giving that person a fish. Look at the biblical notation, which I really
like. You can give a guy a fish, feed him for a
day. You can teach him how to fish and feed him
for a lifetime, including his family. So always try to identify the cause. When you label somebody with a syndrome, it
doesn’t really mean anything. All it means is you’ve given this very powerful
word to somebody saying, “This is the disease you’ve got and now we’re going to treat it
with drugs, or surgery, or diet.” So you could give me 10 or 20 people in my
room now that have all been diagnosed with IBS. I would test each one of them and find every
single person has got a different microbiome, there was some problems. Every single one of those people will have
had a different life circumstance or situation leading up to their gut problem. Some may have gone through a divorce, bankruptcy. Others may have lost family members and the
serious grief of trauma. Some of themselves may have been involved
in some terrible situation. I’ve seen IBS in soldiers that have come back
from Afghanistan, I’ve seen IBS in single moms, I’ve seen IBS in Presidents of big companies,
I’ve seen it across the board. So the garage, in my opinion the garbage can,
is where people love to dump, practitioners particularly. Not just medical practitioners, but naturopaths
as well, and some chiropractors. They’ll dump the patient in their garbage
can and hope someone else takes it away. Because many practitioners don’t like syndromes. They find it too daunting, too complicated,
too time consuming dealing with people like this. But I can assure you, there’s always a cause
when their gut goes astray, when something happens. Identifying that cause or trying to work through
the reasons why this happened and what’s continuing it on is not a garbage can. It’s quite an intelligent approach. You don’t have to- Labeling people is one
thing, but then giving them treatments that are based on protocol based around the condition
is wrong. In my opinion, it’s completely wrong. No two people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome
often have the same type of treatment. So when naturopaths graduate, and same with
medical doctors in the first probably five or 10 years of their practice, they’ve got
cookie cutter protocols for just about every condition. I’ve got them on the computer too, I’ve got
over 1000 word documents for every condition you could imagine, which is a protocol. This is a disease, these are the pills you
give, this is the diet. Doesn’t work, sorry. It doesn’t work for the majority. I don’t like garbage cans in my clinic at
all. I prefer to work one-on-one with people, try
and solve their problems along side them, if they can honestly give me the information
I need. We can go a long ways towards repairing the
IBS. So in Irritable Bowel Syndrome, at least 50%
of those cases have got a serious problem in terms of some sort of overgrowth. They’ll have small intestinal bowel overgrowth,
they could have a colonic problem, they could have a candida issue, a big overgrowth of
yeast in part of the digestive tract. They could have parasites. There could be anything there at all. Some people have the craziest, wackiest diets
I’ve ever seen. That can lead to IBS as well. And with dealing with people in over 50/60
countries, I see the most amazing diets that people follow. And sometimes, just a small change in the
diet can change the irritation to the bowel and fix it up. As simple as that. Some people need complicated solutions, but
in most cases, it’s a simple solution. Practitioners don’t need to put patients in
garbage tins and hope that the garbage guy takes them away. If they spend time with the person, if they
do the appropriate testing, if they try and act a bit like a psychologist trying to understand
the person’s mindset, leading towards the bowel problems. So that’s my take on it. Don’t fall for the garbage can diagnosis. Don’t fall for the cookie cutter protocol
from your practitioner. As soon as you’re given a piece of paper and
it’s got Irritable Bowel Syndrome on it and it’s got a specific diet on it, and you find
it comes from a stack of 50 pieces of paper with the same print on it, you know that you’re
probably going to be led down the garden path. So find someone who can work one-on-one and
you won’t need to be put in a garbage can. Thank for tuning in.

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